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Frequently Asked Questions

Explore our FAQs

Explore these frequently asked questions about WRAP's services and supports, as well as specifc questions related to domestic violence, sexual assault, the Relative Caregiver Program and our Community Outreach program. Click on the question or section to be taken to the response(s). If you have a question that has not been answered or if you need additional information, please send us an email via our Contact Us form or call our Helpline at 800-273-8712 or our Main Office at 731-668-0411.

General Questions:

What does WRAP stand for?

What programs does WRAP offer? 

What communities does WRAP serve?

What does it cost to receive WRAP services?

Does WRAP only help women? 

I need legal help. Can WRAP help me find an attorney?

I think I need counseling. Does WRAP provide that?

How do I file an order of protection?

No one believes me when I tell them that I was abused/assaulted. What should I do?

I’m homeless and need a place to stay. How can WRAP help me? 

I have a court date coming up soon (Order of Protection / Criminal Court) against the perpetrator. Can WRAP help me?

I am the victim of a crime. What are my rights? 
I was injured as a result of a crime. Is there financial help for me? 
Is there a program that can help keep my address confidential?

I believe that I have been discriminated against by WRAP. What can I do?

Do I have to make a police report or talk to the police in order to work with WRAP?

I don’t want anyone to know that I am reaching out to WRAP. Will you tell anyone that I have contacted you?

I work during the day and can’t make phone calls while at work. How can WRAP help me if I am only free to meet after hours?

Someone is stalking me. Can WRAP help?

Someone at my workplace / someone I know revealed domestic violence / sexual assault. Can WRAP call them?

Why don’t victims report assault or abuse to law enforcement?

Domestic Violence Related Questions:

What is Domestic Violence?

How do I know if I’m in an unhealthy relationship?

What should I do if I feel like I’m in danger?

Is it safe to go to a neighbor or relative’s house when deciding what to do?

What if I’m NOT ready to leave my home and/or my partner?

What help is available through WRAP if I’m ready to leave my abuser?

I’m planning to leave my abusive partner. How do I prepare to get out?

What are the most important documents and items I should bring with me?

Does WRAP have a shelter?

I was abused a long time ago but I’m still struggling to process what happened. Can WRAP help me? 

What are some red flags I need to look out for in a relationship?

I have family/friends in West Tennessee and I am fleeing an abusive relationship. Can WRAP help me get to the area to be with them?

I live in West Tennessee and need to flee an abusive relationship. Can WRAP help me leave the area to be with family/friends?

I have an active case with DCS. What can WRAP do for me?

My abuser tracks my phone calls and texts. I’m scared to call. What should I do? 

I’m worried about my children. They weren’t abused, but I know that they heard the abuse. Can WRAP help them?

If I’m in an abusive relationship and have children, will WRAP call DCS on me?

I feel embarrassed because I stayed in an unhealthy relationship. I feel like it’s my fault and I should have done something sooner. How can WRAP help me? 
My abuser was arrested after assaulting me, but I don’t want them to go to jail. Will I be arrested if I don’t show up to court?

Is domestic violence really a problem in West Tennessee? 
Why do people stay in an unhealthy relationship? 

What should I do if someone I know is experiencing domestic violence?

There is someone at my workplace / someone I know who is currently in danger and they are with me right now. How can WRAP help them?

Sexual Assault Related Questions:

What is sexual assault?

How do I know if I’ve been sexually assaulted?

What should I do if I've been sexually assaulted?

Can WRAP help if my child has been abused?

I was abused a long time ago but I’m still struggling to process what happened. Can WRAP help me? 

My loved one is in prison/jail. They told me that they are afraid of being sexually assaulted / they have been sexually assaulted. How can WRAP help them?

Relative Caregiver Program Questions:

I’m caring for the children of a family member and I’d like to know about the Relative Caregiver Program. How do I know if I qualify?
I know someone who is caring for the children of relatives and I think the Relative Caregiver Program would be a good fit for them. What should I do?

Community Outreach & Support Questions:

My business / employer would like to support WRAP. Who can I talk to about this?

I have some items I’d like to donate to WRAP. What should I do? 

Can WRAP come speak to my civic group, workplace, church or school?

General Questions:

 

What does WRAP stand for?

WRAP stands for the Wo/Men's Resource and Rape Assistance Program

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What programs does WRAP offer? 

WRAP provides trauma-informed and evidence-based programs that include:  Domestic Violence Response, Sexual Assault Response, Residential Services, Relative Caregiver Program and Community Outreach

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What communities does WRAP serve? 

WRAP’s services for survivors of intimate partner violence or sexual violence, along with their families, are offered in 19 counties in West Tennessee including: Benton, Carroll, Chester, Crocket, Decatur, Dyer, Gibson, Hardeman, Hardin, Haywood, Henderson, Henry, Lake, Lauderdale, Madison, McNairy, Obion, Tipton, Weakley. The Relative Caregiver Program covers the above 19 counties including Fayette County. Visit our Locations page for contact information for each county. 

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What does it cost to receive WRAP services?

All WRAP services are provided free of charge to survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. We believe that everyone deserves access to support and resources regardless of their financial situation. Our services are funded through grants, donations, and community support to ensure that there are no financial barriers for survivors seeking help. Your safety and well-being are our top priorities, and we are here to support you without any cost or financial obligation.

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Does WRAP only help women? 

No, WRAP provides services to all individuals, regardless of gender. We are committed to supporting survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, regardless of their gender identity or expression. Our services are inclusive and tailored to meet the unique needs of each survivor, regardless of their gender. We believe in equality and providing support to anyone who has experienced abuse or trauma.

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I need legal help. Can WRAP help me find an attorney?

Our advocates can provide referrals and guide you through the process of accessing legal support. We work closely with legal service providers to ensure you have the necessary resources to navigate the legal system effectively. Contact us to discuss your specific needs, and we will help connect you with the appropriate legal resources.

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I think I need counseling. Does WRAP provide that?

Yes, WRAP provides psycho-educational counseling services to individuals and families who have experienced domestic violence or sexual assault. Our trained and compassionate advocates offer support, guidance, and a safe space for you to process your experiences and emotions. We understand the unique challenges faced by survivors and tailor our approach to meet your specific needs. We can also assist in providing referrals to licensed counselors and other providers for additional support. Please reach out to us, and we can discuss the options available to you and help you access the support you deserve.

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How do I file an order of protection?

An order of protection is an order issued by a court to prohibit someone from abusing, stalking or sexually assaulting you. You can file an order of protection in circuit, chancery or general sessions court. You do not have to have an attorney and you will not be assessed any court fees. A WRAP advocate can assist you in completing an Order of Protection for the area you are located in, as processes for filing may vary from court to court. A copy of the order will be served on the person who is abusing, stalking or sexually assaulting you. In most jurisdictions, a court hearing will be held within 15 days from the date the order is served. You must go to the hearing and a WRAP advocate can be there with you for support. At the hearing the judge will decide whether or not to give you an order of protection that can last for up to one year. Some victims may get an ex-parte order of protection (temporary order) before the order of protection is issued. The TN Coalition has downloadable information about Orders of Protection on their website, and the TN State Courts website has additional forms. This information is not legal advice. It is for informational purposes only. You should consult a lawyer for legal advice specific to your situation as each county handles cases differently.

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No one believes me when I tell them that I was assaulted or abused. What should I do?

If you are facing disbelief when disclosing abuse, it can be an incredibly challenging and disheartening experience. Remember that you are not alone, and there are steps you can take to seek support and validation:

  • Reach Out to Trusted Individuals: Seek support from people you trust, such as close friends, family members, or co-workers. Sharing your experience with empathetic and understanding individuals can help you feel heard and supported.

  • Contact a Supportive Organization: Reach out to WRAP. We can offer guidance, resources, and non-judgmental assistance. We start by believing!

  • Document Your Experience: Consider keeping a journal or written record of the incidents of abuse and their impact on your well-being. This documentation can serve as evidence if you choose to involve legal authorities later on.

  • Speak with a Professional: Seek counseling or therapy with a licensed mental health professional who has experience in trauma and abuse. A trained therapist can provide a safe and supportive space to process your experiences and emotions.

  • Seek Legal Support: If you are pursuing legal action against your abuser, consult with a lawyer experienced in domestic violence or sexual assault cases. They can provide legal advice and represent you during court proceedings. WRAP advocates can provide you with referrals for legal support. 

  • Focus on Self-Care: Prioritize self-care activities that promote healing and emotional well-being. Engage in activities that bring you comfort, relaxation, and joy.

  • Educate Others: Consider educating those who are dismissive or skeptical about abuse and its impact. Raising awareness about the complexities of abuse can help combat misconceptions. WRAP can provide you with support and information to share with others.

  • Set Boundaries: If someone continues to dismiss or invalidate your experience, it may be necessary to limit or cut off contact with them temporarily or permanently. Your well-being is essential, and surrounding yourself with supportive individuals is crucial.

Remember that your experiences and emotions are valid, and healing is possible with the right support. WRAP and other organizations are here to listen, believe, and assist you on your journey towards healing and recovery.

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I’m homeless and need a place to stay. How can WRAP help me? 

At WRAP, we understand the urgent need for safe housing. While we have a confidential safe home program, space availability is limited to individuals and families who meet specific criteria. However, our dedicated advocates are here to support you by providing referrals to other resources in your area that can assist with housing needs. We are committed to helping you find the support and resources necessary for your situation, ensuring your safety and well-being.

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I have a court date coming up soon (Order of Protection / Criminal Court) against the perpetrator. Can WRAP help me? 

Yes, WRAP can provide assistance and support for survivors navigating the legal process. Our advocates can help you understand your rights, provide information on the court process, and offer emotional support during this challenging time. While we are not attorneys, we can help you access legal resources, connect you with legal aid services, and provide court accompaniment if needed. Our goal is to ensure you feel supported and empowered throughout your legal journey.

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I am the victim of a crime. What are my rights? 

By virtue of being a victim, you have certain rights as provided by Article 1, Section 35 of the Constitution of Tennessee.

  • The right to confer with the prosecution.

  • The right to be free from intimidation, harassment, and abuse throughout the criminal justice system.

  • The right to be present at all proceedings where the defendant has the right to be present.

  • The right to be heard, when relevant, at all critical stages of the criminal justice process as defined by the statute.

  • The right to be informed of all the proceedings and the release, transfer, escape, or recapture of the accused or convicted person.

  • The right to a speedy trial or disposition and a prompt and final conclusion of the case after the conviction or sentence.

  • The right to restitution from the defender. 

  • The right to be informed of each of the rights established for victims.

The following phone numbers are for your information and convenience in exercising your rights:

  • Victims of Crime State Coordinating Council - (800) 289-9018

  • Criminal Injuries Compensation Program - (615) 741-2734

  • Statewide Victim Witness Coordinator - (615) 532-5591

  • Probation and Parole - (615) 741-1150

  • Tennessee Department of Correction - (615) 741-1000 Ext. 4006

  • Tenn. Attorney General (appeals Info only) - (615) 532-1971

 

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I was injured as a result of a crime. Is there financial help for me? 

The State of Tennessee has a fund to reimburse innocent victims of violent crimes or their dependents who have suffered out-of-pocket expenses due to physical injuries, loss of income, or death. 

  • A written claim must be filed within two years after the date of the criminal offense. 

  • The victim must fully cooperate with the law enforcement officials in their investigation and the prosecution of such crime. 

  • The victim must report the crime to the proper authorities within 48 hours after it occurred. 

  • The person may not be eligible for these benefits if that individual contributed to his or her own victimization in anyway, such as participating in the criminal act that led to injury or death.

  • This fund does not pay for your personal property that was stolen or destroyed by a crime.

For additional information about Victims' Compensation or assistance with filing, contact WRAP at 1-800-273-8712; visit the state's website ; or call the Division of Claims Administration at 615-741-2734.

 

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Is there a program that can help keep my address confidential?

Yes. The Safe at Home Address Confidentiality Program is a statewide address confidentiality program administered by the Office of the Tennessee Secretary of State. It is open to all victims of domestic abuse, stalking, human trafficking, rape, sexual battery, or any other sexual offense who satisfy eligibility and application requirements at no cost. Once a participant has been approved, they are provided with a ‘substitute’ address that can be used by them and their children as their official mailing address for all state and local government purposes, including public school or public benefits enrollment, subject only to a few limited exceptions. WRAP has advocates who are certified to submit Safe at Home applications. Contact WRAP to speak to an advocate about the Safe at Home program.

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I believe that I have been discriminated against by WRAP. What can I do?

WRAP complies with the Title VI of the Civil Rights Act as stated below:

 

No person on the grounds of handicap, or disability, age, race, color, religion, gender, gender identity, national origin, or any other classification protected by Federal and/or Tennessee State constitutional and/or statutory law shall be excluded from participation in, or be denied benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination in the performance of the contract or in the employment practices of the Contractor. The Contractor shall, upon request, show proof of such non-discrimination, and shall post in conspicuous places, available to all employees and applicants, notice of non-discrimination.

Any violators of these guidelines should be reported immediately to the WRAP Title VI Coordinator, Renee Bowman, for the appropriate procedures to be followed in filing a complaint. As a survivor of domestic or sexual violence, if you feel you have been discriminated against in the provision of services by a WRAP employee, we urge you to report this immediately (within 30 days) to the WRAP Title VI Coordinator.

We have a formal grievance policy in place to address any complaints or concerns regarding discrimination. We encourage you to review our grievance policy, which outlines the steps to follow if you believe you have been discriminated against. Our commitment is to ensure a safe and inclusive environment for all individuals we serve, and we are dedicated to addressing any issues that may arise. Review our Title VI Compliance Policy as well.

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Do I have to make a police report or talk to the police in order to work with WRAP?

No, making a police report or talking to the police is not a requirement to work with WRAP. We respect your autonomy and decision-making process. Our advocates are here to support you and provide services regardless of whether or not you choose to involve law enforcement. We are here to listen, believe you, and assist you based on your individual needs and preferences. Your safety and well-being are our top priorities.

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I don’t want anyone to know that I am reaching out to WRAP. Will you tell anyone that I have contacted you?

No, your privacy and confidentiality are of utmost importance to us. WRAP maintains strict confidentiality protocols, and we will not disclose your contact or any information about our interactions without your explicit consent, except in situations where there is a legal obligation to report specific information. We prioritize your safety and well-being, and our services are provided in a confidential and non-judgmental manner. You can trust that your information will be kept private and secure when you reach out to WRAP. View our Confidentiality Policy.

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I work during the day and can’t make phone calls while at work. How can WRAP help me if I am only free to meet after hours?

We understand that accessing support during regular business hours may be challenging for many individuals. WRAP offers after-hours support through our helpline. If you are only available after hours, our advocates will try to work with you to set up a time to meet. We are committed to providing support and assistance when you need it, even outside of traditional business hours.

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Someone is stalking me. Can WRAP help? 

Yes, WRAP can provide assistance and support if you are experiencing stalking. Our advocates can help you develop a safety plan, explore legal options such as obtaining a restraining order, and connect you with resources and services to address your specific needs. Stalking is a serious concern, and we are here to support you in navigating through this difficult situation.

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Someone at my workplace / someone I know revealed domestic violence / sexual assault. Can WRAP call them?

 If someone you know has disclosed domestic violence or sexual assault and you believe they may benefit from WRAP's support, we encourage you to encourage them to reach out to us directly. We prioritize the confidentiality and autonomy of survivors, and it is important for individuals to contact us at their own pace and comfort level. We are here to provide compassionate and empowering assistance, but it is ultimately their decision to connect with us. We can provide resources and information for you to share with them, and they can reach out to us when they are ready. Download our bystander guide for more information. 

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Why don’t victims report assault or abuse to law enforcement?

There are many reasons why victims may choose not to report assault or abuse to law enforcement. Some common reasons include fear of retaliation, concern about not being believed, shame or embarrassment, financial dependency on the abuser, cultural or social pressures, and lack of awareness about available support services. WRAP is here to provide confidential support and resources, regardless of whether a survivor chooses to report to law enforcement.

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Domestic Violence Related Questions:

What is Domestic Violence?

Domestic violence is not “an isolated incident,” “a lovers’ quarrel” or “a private family matter.” It is a pattern of coercive and controlling behaviors that one person in an intimate relationship uses against another. Every relationship has ups and downs, but domestic violence includes repeated behaviors with the aim of coercion and control. People who use violence try to control aspects of a partner’s life through fear, threats, manipulation, and other tactics. Sometimes–but not always–people use physical and/or sexual violence as a way to dominate an intimate partner.

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How do I know if I’m in an unhealthy relationship?

Recognizing if you are in an unhealthy relationship can be challenging, but some signs to watch for include:

  1. Lack of trust and respect

  2. Constant criticism or belittling

  3. Controlling behavior

  4. Isolation from friends and family

  5. Emotional manipulation or abuse

  6. Physical violence or threats

  7. Feeling afraid or unsafe

If you're unsure, consider talking to a professional or reaching out to WRAP for support and guidance.

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What should I do if I feel like I’m in danger?

If you feel like you are in immediate danger, prioritize your safety. Call 911 or your local emergency number. Reach out to WRAP's 24/7 helpline at 800-273-8712 for immediate support and safety planning. Consider finding a safe place away from the danger, such as a trusted friend's house or a public place. Trust your instincts and seek help as soon as possible. Your safety is our priority, and we are here to support you. Download our Safety Planning Checklist for additional information.

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Is it safe to go to a neighbor or relative’s house when deciding what to do?

Seeking refuge at a neighbor or relative's house can be a potential option for immediate safety; however, it's essential to assess the situation carefully. Here are a few factors to consider:

  • Trust and Safety: Ensure that the neighbor or relative is someone you trust and feel safe with. Consider their ability to maintain confidentiality and provide support during this challenging time.

  • Perpetrator's Knowledge: Assess whether the abuser is aware of your connection to the neighbor or relative. If there is a risk of the abuser finding you or escalating the situation, it might be safer to explore alternative options, such as a confidential shelter.

  • Boundaries and Consent: Communicate your needs and concerns with the neighbor or relative clearly. Obtain their consent before seeking temporary refuge in their home to respect their boundaries.

  • Safety Plan: Create a safety plan in collaboration with a trusted organization like WRAP. They can help assess the risks and provide guidance on the safest course of action, including finding secure shelter options.

Remember, each situation is unique, and what works for one person may not be appropriate for another. It's crucial to prioritize your safety and consult with professionals who specialize in domestic violence support to make informed decisions. Download our safety planning checklist for more information.

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What if I’m NOT ready to leave my home and/or my partner?

We understand that every survivor's situation is unique, and the decision to leave an abusive relationship is deeply personal and complex. WRAP is here to support you regardless of your readiness to leave. Our advocates can provide confidential support, safety planning, resources, and information to help you navigate your circumstances and make choices that prioritize your safety and well-being. You are not alone, and we are here to support you whenever you are ready to take the next step. Review this safety planning checklist for more details.

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What help is available through WRAP if I’m ready to leave my abuser?

If you are ready to leave your abuser, WRAP provides comprehensive support and resources to help you through this transition. Our services include safety planning, emergency shelter placement, legal advocacy, counseling, and assistance with accessing community resources. Contact us to speak with an advocate who can guide you through the process and provide personalized support. Also, download our Safety Planning Checklist

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I’m planning to leave my abusive partner. How do I prepare to get out?

Preparing to leave an abusive partner requires careful planning. Here are some steps you can take:

  • Create a safety plan: Develop a plan to ensure your safety and the safety of your children. This may include identifying a safe place to go, packing essential items, and having important documents ready.

  • Reach out for support: Contact WRAP to speak with an advocate who can provide guidance, resources, and emotional support as you navigate this process.

  • Secure your financial independence: Start saving money if possible, open a separate bank account, and gather important financial documents.

  • Document evidence: Keep records of any incidents of abuse, including dates, times, and descriptions. Take photos of injuries, damaged property, or threatening messages.

  • Inform trusted individuals: Share your situation with a few trusted family members or friends who can provide support and assistance when needed.

Remember, each situation is unique, and it's important to tailor your plan to your specific circumstances. Our advocates are here to help you every step of the way. Contact WRAP for help with safety planning and download our Safety Planning Checklist for more support.

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What are the most important documents and items I should bring with me?

When fleeing an abusive relationship, it's essential to prioritize your safety and gather critical documents and items. Consider taking the following items with you:

1. Identification documents: ID, driver's license, passport, social security card, birth certificates for you and your children.

2. Financial documents: Credit cards, bank account information, checkbooks, pay stubs, and any important financial records.

3. Legal documents: Copies of any restraining orders, protection orders, custody orders, and divorce papers.

4. Health documents: Medical records, prescription medications, and health insurance information.

5. Phone and charger: Ensure you have a functioning phone to stay connected and call for help if needed.

6. Personal items: Personal hygiene products, a change of clothes, and any sentimental or irreplaceable items.

7. Emergency cash: Have some cash on hand for immediate needs.

Remember, safety is paramount, and it's essential to trust your instincts. If you cannot gather all the items immediately, focus on getting to a safe location and reach out to WRAP for support and resources. We are here to help you every step of the way. Download our Safety Planning Checklist for more information. Your emotional safety is also important. Download our Emotional Safety Plan.

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Does WRAP have a shelter?

Yes, WRAP provides residential services for individuals and families fleeing domestic violence. We have safe and secure safe homes where survivors can find refuge and receive comprehensive support. Our safe homes offer a supportive and confidential environment, where survivors can access essential resources, counseling, advocacy, and assistance in planning for their future. If you are in need of shelter, please contact our helpline or reach out to us, and we will guide you through the process of accessing our shelter services. Your safety and well-being are our top priorities.

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I was abused a long time ago but I’m still struggling to process what happened. Can WRAP help me? 

Absolutely. WRAP is here to support survivors at any stage of their healing journey, even if the abuse occurred in the past. We understand that the effects of trauma can be long-lasting, and our trained professionals are experienced in providing compassionate assistance to individuals who are still struggling to process their past experiences. We offer counseling services, support groups, and resources tailored to your specific needs, helping you find healing, empowerment, and a path towards recovery. You don't have to face this alone - WRAP is here to help you reclaim your life and find hope for the future.

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What are some red flags I need to look out for in a relationship? 

Recognizing red flags in a relationship is crucial for identifying potential abusive or unhealthy dynamics. Here are some common red flags to be aware of:

  • Jealousy and possessiveness: Excessive jealousy, constant accusations, and attempts to control your interactions with others are warning signs.

  • Controlling behavior: A partner who isolates you from friends and family, monitors your activities, or dictates what you can wear or do may exhibit controlling tendencies.

  • Verbal or emotional abuse: Frequent insults, demeaning language, belittling, or manipulating your emotions are signs of emotional abuse.

  • Physical aggression or threats: Any form of physical violence, whether hitting, pushing, or threats of harm, should never be tolerated.

  • Unpredictable mood swings: Drastic and unpredictable mood shifts, especially coupled with explosive anger, can indicate potential abusive behavior.

  • Disrespect for boundaries: Disregarding your boundaries, privacy, or personal space is a violation of trust and a red flag.

  • Gaslighting: Manipulating your perception of reality, making you doubt your sanity, or downplaying their harmful actions are manipulative tactics known as gaslighting.

  • Isolation from support systems: Intentionally isolating you from friends, family, or support networks can be a tactic used to gain control and power over you.

Remember, one red flag does not necessarily indicate an abusive relationship, but multiple or consistent signs should not be ignored. If you are experiencing any of these red flags or have concerns about a relationship, it is essential to reach out for support and guidance from organizations like WRAP, who can provide assistance and resources. Download our guide to Red Flags.

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I have family/friends in West Tennessee and I am fleeing an abusive relationship. Can WRAP help me get to the area to be with them?

If you need to reach West Tennessee to be with your family or friends for safety, WRAP advocates are here to assist you. Our dedicated team can help you with safety planning, provide valuable resource connections, and offer emotional support throughout your journey. While our safe home services may be an option, availability and program criteria apply. Please note that currently, WRAP does not have the funding to provide transportation assistance to our area. However, our advocates can help connect you with agencies in the area you are fleeing from, who may be able to assist you in reaching West Tennessee. Your safety and well-being are our top priorities, and we will do our best to guide and support you during this challenging time.

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I live in West Tennessee and need to flee an abusive relationship. Can WRAP help me leave the area to be with family/friends?

At WRAP, your safety is our top priority. Our dedicated advocates are here to support you in developing a comprehensive safety plan, considering both short-term and long-term solutions. If it is determined that leaving the area is the best course of action for your safety, WRAP may be able to provide assistance to help you reach a place of longer-term safety. Our team is committed to helping you navigate this difficult situation and find the support you need.

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I have an active case with DCS. What can WRAP do for me?

WRAP can provide support and advocacy to individuals involved in cases with the Department of Children's Services (DCS) through our DCS Liaison Program. Our advocates can help you navigate the DCS process, understand your rights, and provide emotional support throughout the case. We can also connect you with additional resources and services to ensure the well-being and safety of you and your children. Our goal is to support you during this challenging time and help you access the assistance you need. Contact our DCS WRAP Liaison, Justis Mashburn, for more information.

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My abuser tracks my phone calls and texts. I’m scared to call. What should I do? 

Your safety is our top priority. If you're concerned about your communication being monitored, it's important to take precautions to protect yourself. Consider using a safer method of communication, such as using a friend's or trusted person's phone, a public phone, or a computer at a safe location like a library. You can also reach out to WRAP through our Facebook page or email us directly through our website, which can provide a more discreet way to connect with us. We are here to support you and will work with you to find the safest and most appropriate means of communication. Read about Mobile Apps for victims, different forms of electronic abuse, and other ways to protect yourself from electronic abuse.

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I’m worried about my children. They weren’t abused, but I know that they heard the abuse. Can WRAP help them?

WRAP recognizes the impact of witnessing domestic violence on children and the importance of addressing their needs. Our program provides support and resources for children who have been exposed to domestic violence. We believe in the importance of addressing the effects of domestic violence on the entire family, including children who have witnessed the abuse.

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If I’m in an abusive relationship and have children, will WRAP call DCS on me?

WRAP's primary focus is on supporting and empowering survivors of domestic violence. Our goal is to provide resources, safety planning, and emotional support to help individuals in abusive relationships make informed decisions about their well-being and the well-being of their children. We do not report individuals to child protective services (DCS) without their consent, unless there is an immediate risk of harm to a child. We prioritize confidentiality and respect your right to make choices that are best for you and your family.

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I feel embarrassed because I stayed in an unhealthy relationship. I feel like it’s my fault and I should have done something sooner. How can WRAP help me? 

At WRAP, we understand that each survivor's journey is unique, and we are here to support you without judgment. Our advocates can provide a safe and supportive space for you to express your feelings and concerns. We can help you understand the dynamics of abuse, process your experiences, and work towards healing and rebuilding your life. Remember, you are not alone, and we are here to support you every step of the way.

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My abuser was arrested after assaulting me, but I don’t want them to go to jail. Will I be arrested if I don’t show up to court?

As a victim, you are not responsible for the abuser's legal actions. You won't be arrested for not showing up to court; it's your choice to participate in legal proceedings. WRAP can provide support and resources during this process. This does not constitute legal advice. Please seek legal assistance for specific guidance.

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Is domestic violence really a problem in West Tennessee? 

Yes, domestic violence is a significant issue in West Tennessee, as it is in many other regions. According to the TBI's annual Crime in Tennessee report, nearly 50% of all reported crimes against persons in West TN involve some form of domestic or sexual violence. WRAP is here to provide support, resources, and services to those affected by domestic violence in our community.

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Why do people stay in an unhealthy relationship? 

Seeing your friend or loved one mistreated can make you feel very frustrated, not only at the person who is violent, but also at the loved one for not leaving. There are many reasons that a person decides to return to or stay in an abusive relationship. People often:

  • Fear for their lives and are terrified that their partner will become more violent if they leave. In fact,  the most dangerous time for a person is when they try to leave.

  • Have limited financial resources to break away and believe they cannot make it on their own. 

  • Believe the situation is their fault.

  • Fear that their partner will get custody of the children. 

A person experiencing violence may want the violence to end, but not the relationship. People who abuse are not violent all the time. They often can come across charming  and romantic in between episodes of violence. For more information about how you can help a survivor, download our bystander guide.

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What should I do if someone I know is experiencing domestic violence?

If someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, it's important to take their situation seriously and offer support. Here are some steps you can take:

  • Listen and believe them: Provide a non-judgmental and supportive space for them to share their experiences. Let them know that you believe them and that you are there to support them.

  • Offer resources: Share information about WRAP and other local organizations that provide assistance to survivors of domestic violence. Encourage them to reach out for help and let them know they are not alone.

  • Safety planning: Help them develop a safety plan that outlines steps to enhance their safety, such as identifying safe places to go, creating a code word for emergencies, and documenting incidents of abuse.

  • Encourage professional help: Suggest that they seek support from professionals, such as counselors, therapists, or advocates who specialize in domestic violence.

  • Respect their decisions: Remember that leaving an abusive relationship can be a complex and challenging process. Respect their autonomy and support them in making decisions that are best for their safety and well-being.

  • Keep their confidentiality: Maintain their privacy and confidentiality unless they give you permission to share their situation. Respecting their trust is crucial in supporting them effectively.

Remember, domestic violence is a serious issue, and professional assistance can be invaluable. Encourage the person to reach out to WRAP or other local organizations for comprehensive support. Download our bystander intervention guide for more information.

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There is someone at my workplace / someone I know who is currently in danger and they are with me right now. How can WRAP help them?

If someone is currently in immediate danger and with you, we encourage you to prioritize their safety and well-being, which may mean calling 911 for them. You can assist them by offering support and reassurance. If they are comfortable, you can suggest contacting WRAP on their behalf to explore available options and resources. They will need to give verbal permission to the WRAP advocate to allow you to speak on their behalf. Our advocates are trained to provide guidance and assistance in crisis situations and can help assess the best course of action for their safety. Download our bystander guide for ways to help.

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Sexual Assault Questions

 

What is sexual assault?

Sexual assault is defined to include “unwanted sexual contact that could include touching of a sexual nature, oral sex, sexual intercourse, anal sex, or sexual penetration with a finger or object." Sexual assault occurs when one individual does not give consent or is incapable of giving consent (e.g. under the influence or unconscious).

How do I know if I’ve been sexually assaulted?

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What should I do if I've been sexually assaulted?

  • Ensure your safety. Identify a safe place to go and emotionally process what has taken place. The most important thing to consider is your safety. 

  • Reach out for support.  If you are unable to identify a support system, consider reaching out to WRAP's 24/7 hotline and speak with an advocate. You are not alone. Consider your support system and identify someone to help you process the experience.

  • Consider your medical options. If you choose to seek medical attention, don't change your clothes, shower/bathe, comb your hair, or eat/drink anything if possible. A SANE exam is typically free to the victim and addresses concerns that may arrive after an assault has occurred. (i.e.: assessment of potential injuries, preventative treatment for STI's, and pregnancy concerns) As a victim of Sexual Assault, you have the right to medical treatment. 

  • Consider your legal options. As a victim, you have the choice to report your sexual abuse. Receiving medical treatment does not mean you have to report. (your kit can be held anonymously)

If you have questions, please reach out to WRAP. We can help!

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Can WRAP help if my child has been abused? 

Yes, WRAP can provide support if your child, aged 13 and above, has experienced abuse. Our trained professionals can offer emotional support, resources, and guidance to both you and your child. We are dedicated to helping families navigate through difficult situations and can connect you with appropriate services tailored to your child's needs. For children younger than 13, we can provide referrals to other agencies specializing in child abuse support. Your well-being and the well-being of your child are important to us, and we are here to assist you every step of the way.

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I was sexually assaulted a long time ago but I’m still struggling to process what happened. Can WRAP help me? 

Absolutely. WRAP is here to support survivors at any stage of their healing journey, even if the abuse occurred in the past. We understand that the effects of trauma can be long-lasting, and our trained professionals are experienced in providing compassionate assistance to individuals who are still struggling to process their past experiences. We offer counseling services, support groups, and resources tailored to your specific needs, helping you find healing, empowerment, and a path towards recovery. You don't have to face this alone - WRAP is here to help you reclaim your life and find hope for the future.

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What should I do if someone I know has been sexually assaulted?

If someone you know has been sexually assaulted, it's important to provide support and empower them to make their own choices. Here are some steps you can take:

  • Believe and validate: Listen to them without judgment and assure them that you believe their experience. Let them know that you are there for them and that what happened is not their fault.

  • Encourage medical attention: Suggest that they seek medical care, even if they are unsure about involving law enforcement. Offer to accompany them to a healthcare facility that specializes in sexual assault forensic exams.

  • Respect their decisions: Empower them to make their own choices regarding reporting the assault, seeking counseling, or involving other support services. Respect their autonomy and reassure them that you will support their decisions.

  • Offer resources: Provide information about WRAP and other local organizations that offer support services for survivors of sexual assault. Share helpline numbers, counseling services, and resources for legal assistance.

  • Be patient and supportive: Healing from sexual assault takes time, and everyone's journey is different. Offer ongoing support, understanding, and patience as they navigate their recovery process.

  • Educate yourself: Take the time to educate yourself about sexual assault, consent, and the available resources in your community. This will help you provide informed support and be an ally to survivors.

Remember, it is essential to prioritize the survivor's well-being and respect their choices throughout the process. Encourage them to seek professional support from organizations like WRAP, who specialize in providing assistance to survivors of sexual assault.

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My loved one is in prison/jail. They told me that they are afraid of being sexually assaulted / they have been sexually assaulted. How can WRAP help them?

WRAP recognizes the importance of addressing sexual assault and safety concerns within correctional facilities. Our agency provides support and resources for incarcerated individuals who have experienced or are at risk of sexual assault through our Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) support program. We can offer advocacy, information, and assistance in navigating the reporting process, accessing medical care, and connecting with other relevant support services. Our goal is to ensure the safety and well-being of survivors within the prison system.

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Relative Caregiver Program Questions:


I’m caring for the children of a family member and I’d like to know about the Relative Caregiver Program. Who do I call?

Visit the RCP referrals page and complete the form with your information. You can also call 731-203-1339 for referral and eligibility information. 

 

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I know someone who is caring for the children of relatives and I think the Relative Caregiver Program would be a good fit for them. What should I do?

Encourage them to complete our online referral form, or you can complete it on their behalf if they give you permission to do so. 

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Community Support Questions:

My business / employer would like to support WRAP. Who can I talk to about this?

If your business or employer is interested in supporting WRAP, we greatly appreciate your willingness to contribute to our mission. Please reach out to Jenci Spradlin to discuss potential partnership opportunities. We value collaborations with businesses and organizations that share our commitment to ending domestic violence and supporting survivors. Together, we can make a positive impact in our community.

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I have some items I’d like to donate to WRAP. What should I do? 

If you have items that you would like to donate to WRAP, we appreciate your generosity. Donations can make a significant difference in supporting survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. If you have gently used clothing or home goods, you can email us via our contact form or call our office at 731-668-0411 to coordinate a donation drop-off. Please let us know what county you are in so we can try to connect those items to the advocate nearest you. We have a donations closet at both the Safe Hope Center in Jackson and at 1 Safe Place in Brownsville, but we do not have storage ample space for larger items. If you do have furniture, we will notify our advocates to see if any of our survivors have those needs. We always have needs for new items for those staying in our safe homes and survivors we work with. Check out our Wishlist on Amazon! Your contribution will directly benefit those in need, and we are grateful for your support.

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Can WRAP come speak to my civic group, workplace, church or school?

Absolutely! WRAP is dedicated to raising awareness and promoting understanding about domestic violence and sexual assault. We would be honored to speak at your civic group, workplace, church, or school. Our knowledgeable advocates can provide educational presentations, training sessions, and workshops tailored to your specific needs and audience. You can send us an email via our Contact Us form or you can call our offices at 731-668-0411 to discuss scheduling a presentation or to learn more about how WRAP can support your community. Together, we can make a difference in the lives of survivors and help create a safer, more informed society.

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